tur(i)ntogreen International Student Design Competition

 

tur(i)ntogreenis an International design competition launched by the  Research and Documentation Centre in Technology, Architecture and City in Developing Countries(CRD-PVS) at the Politecnico di Torino(Italy).
With a  distinguished  jury and sponsored by the UN-HABITAT within the “I’m a City Changer” campaign, it is open to University students from around the world. Participants are invited to apply their creative talents in developing new multidisciplinary solutions for sustainable and inclusive cities reflecting on new forms of urban management and regeneration through agro – housing and urban – farming models.
What.
Imagine a neighbourhood that connects the city withthe fields not only physically but also from the cultural, philosophical and environmental perspective. This will be the agriculture and food production district in Turin (Italy), where people  will be living in a  farmingoriented urban realm.
One narrow area of the FIAT, one of the biggest carfactory of the World, in the Mirafiori plant, devoted to production stock parking, has been working as a second barrier to the expansion and integration of the South Mirafiori neighbourhood with the City. Now it has the chance to provide
Turin with a new model of urban life. Dwellings integrated with food production, in traditional (surface field) or innovative (vertical)
models; housing for low income people and immigrants, with agricultural skills; spaces, services and features to let younger generation to reinvent their own way to work; urban farming that opens to a new economy, including education, documentation, food retail, agricultural and zoo-technical services.
Why.
The massive global economical transformations, the  redistribution of wealth and rights, new places and methods of production in goods and services aretransforming the boundaries of the contemporary cities; the fragile balance between rural areas and urban settlements is quickly evolving. Younger generations from the rural areas  in the whole world continue moving into the cities, claiming the right to share the benefits supplied by joint services, wealth and employment, peculiarities of the city even if they imply unacceptable life conditions. This has already led to an
increase in urban population that generates the demand for new architectural solutions that must cover for the new figures ensuring dignity and integrated living conditions.
Where(45°1’30.71″N, 7°36’22.92″E)
Turin – the Italian  motownof the 20th century – got to know these phenomena very well. In more than one situation of recent Italian history this city has been the home for many people and families coming from other sides of the Country. Between 1963 and 1965, South Mirafiori neighbourhood had been the first area selected to become a massive social housing development and urban expansion, with 1 million of cubic meters and a total of 2000 apartments in 35 high rise buildings.Just on the other side of the road the biggest Italian car factory plant – FIAT Mirafiori – was employing 80.000 people. Today the neighbourhood and the social housing dwellings – mainly owned by users now – are no more sustainable in terms of maintenance costs; apartments were given to people according to the members of their families differently from the contemporary model; the entire neighbourhood was designed as a living and working system together, in the 60’s in Turin represented by the FIAT factories in Mirafiori and Rivalta Torinese. The neighbourhood overall population is decreased from 20.000 to 6.000 and FIAT has around 10.000 employees.
On one side energy costs and environmental issues,  property values and building quality, unemployment, new global manufacturing scenarios; on the other hand the environmental features, the local ongoing projects, the community activities and the urban strategies for the western Turin
make South Mirafiori an extremely high potential urban district in terms of social and economic development still to be explored.

Web site – http://www.polito.it/turintogreen
Email – info@turintogreen.org
Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/turintogreen
Twitter – http://www.twitter.com/turintogr

 

Advertisements

IFLA Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IFLA President, Desiree Marinez & IFLA 2012 SGJA Winner, Prof. Mihàly Möcsényi
[courtesy of Bruce Eitzen NWA]

 

 

WINNER ANNOUNCED FOR THE INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS’ PREMIER AWARD – SIR GEOFFREY JELLICOE AWARD 2012

The International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA), which represents the worldwide profession of landscape architecture, announced today that Mihály Möcsényi is the winner of the Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award – the International Federation of Landscape Architects’ premier award – for 2012.

Mihály Möcsényi has made an outstanding contribution to Landscape Architecture through his life-long commitment to his chosen profession. His achievement in all aspects of landscape architecture – landscape planning, landscape research, landscape design and landscape education has been quite phenomenal.

Professor Möcsényi (Hungary) started to work in University education already in 1945. He was teaching landscape design and landscaping. Since 1970 he became the head of the Department of Landscape and Garden Architecture school in Budapest, Hungary. He integrated the technical and aesthetic knowledge together with an ecological and economic approach to landscape architecture education.

He started his career in the field of education, and studied at different institutions parallel to his teaching. He studied history, archaeology, art history, and economics, technical-architectural, artistic and aesthetic matters, in order to acquire and pass on a fuller, more valuable and comprehensive body of knowledge to his students. He worked as a practitioner at the same time as he was teaching and says that: “Every day we need to prepare ourselves to spend the next day useful”.

His philosophy: A teacher also has to have constant, direct connection with professional practice has inspired thousands of Hungarian landscape architecture students. He also encouraged students to go abroad to widen their minds in the fields of landscape architecture.

In 1968 he officially defined landscape as “cultural product” and defined landscape as “humanized nature”. This established the basis of landscape architecture and planning in Hungary as an integrative and ecological approach – , a revolutionary change from the former the purely geographical landscape approach.

Because of political reasons he asked for retirement in 1979, and started to work more internationally. He had for a long time been engaged in IFLA, and was elected Vice-president IFLA Central Region from 1982-86 and IFLA President from 1986-1990. He had an essential role in involving the Eastern European countries into IFLA and was involved in the opening up of these countries for international relationships, education and the starting up new national associations for landscape architects.

After the collapse of the communist system in Hungary in 1990, he was called back to the university and was elected as rector from 1991-93, and founded the Faculty of Landscape Architecture in Budapest in 1992.

He has clearly had a unique and lasting impact on the development of landscape architecture as a practitioner and on the promotion of the profession of landscape architecture. Mihály Möcsényi has, within 70 years of active work, opened many doors, minds and hearts to an awareness of, and integration of landscape architecture. His life achievement is an example for everybody to follow and he is a most worthy recipient of this year’s IFLA Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award.

The IFLA Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award is the highest honor that the International Federation of Landscape Architects can bestow upon a landscape architect. The Award recognizes a living landscape architect whose lifetime achievements and contributions have had a unique and lasting impact on the welfare of society and the environment and on the promotion of the profession of landscape architecture. The award is bestowed annually on an academic, public or private practitioner whose work and achievements are respected internationally.

The IFLA Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award was launched in 2004 on a quadrennial basis. Its inaugural recipient was Peter Walker (USA) in 2005. Prof. Bernard Lassus (France) was awarded in 2009 and Cornelia Hahn Oberlander in 2011. From 2011 the award will be bestowed annually.

Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe (1910 – 1996), IFLA President of Honour, served IFLA as its founding President from 1948 – 1954. He was a trained architect, town planner, landscape architect and garden designer, but his prime interest was in landscape and garden design. Jellicoe was a founding member (1929) and then President of the Institute of Landscape Architects (now the LI) and was knighted for services to landscape architecture in 1979. In 1994, he was given the Royal Horticultural Society’s highest award, the Victoria Medal of Honor.

The IFLA President, Desiree Martinez, will make the announcement in the Award Ceremony during the IFLA 2012 IFLA World Congress in Cape Town, South Africa on September the 7th.. The winner will present a lecture as part of the ceremony.

The 2012 SGJA International Jury, was chaired by Jenny B. Osuldsen (Norway) and comprised: Anton Comrie (South Africa), Alan Titchener (New Zealand), Rosa Klias (Brazil) and Fritz Auweck (Germany).